Pandesal

Pandesal is my Hero, it always save my day! Onboard it is the easiest and fastest Filipino bread to make. At home it is always available in every bakery. Imagine how great is this bread, invented in 16th Century Spanish-Era Philippines, survived a lot of revolutions and 2 World War. And now, feeding more than 100 million Filipinos.

I was curious who to thank for this magical bread rolls. And just recently I heard the news on the radio that Philippine History Subject will be omitted on college curriculum. I feel sad about it knowing that my kids will not anymore get the chance to learn Philippine History when they go to college.

I strongly believe that history are the best mentors.

We usually take for granted of things or people because we don’t have any idea of it’s true value. And history/herstory is the only source of knowledge  to determine something or someone’s real value.

One of the most neglected thing is SALT (Spanish: Sal) 

Salt Salary-9753

In Africa, salt was used as currency south of the Sahara, and slabs of rock salt were used as coins in Abyssinia.
Moorish merchants in the 6th century traded salt for gold, weight for weight.

The word salad literally means “salted”, and comes from the ancient Roman practice of salting leaf vegetables.

Salt Salary-9760

The word salary originates from Latin: salarium which referred to the money paid to the Roman Army’s soldiers for the purchase of salt.

I dedicate this post to Ferdinand Magellan a Portuguese sea captain who led

five Spanish ships and 251 men in the first voyage around the World.

The brave men of the 1500’s, like Ferdinand Magellan, who sailed in uncharted waters to unknown lands were courageous adventurers who were motivated by fame, glory and the wealth. The living conditions on board the small ships were basic and the voyages were very dangerous.

Without them, Pandesal will never made its way on the Islands of the Philippines.

Pandesal (Spanish: pan de sal, “salt bread”) is a bread roll made of flour, eggs, yeast, sugar, and salt. It has become a common food item in the Philippines. Individual loaves are shaped by rolling the dough into long logs (bastón) which are rolled in fine bread crumbs. These are then portioned, allowed to rise, and baked. Contrary to its name, pandesal tastes slightly sweet rather than salty.

Enough with the history!

Pandesal Photo by Nino Almendra
Pandesal
Photo by Nino Almendra

Now on with the cooking…

Pandesal

Prep. time: 5 minutes

Kneading time: 10-12 minutes {I always use electric dough mixer onboard.}

Proofing time: 1-2 hours 1st dough raise, 1 hour more to raise the formed Pandesal dough

Baking time: 10 minutes {or a little more until golden brown}

Oven Temp.: 200’C

Difficulty: Easy but need some practice!

Makes; 48 pieces

Good for 24 crew

You will need;

1 kg. all purpose flour/bread flour

2 Tbsp. instant yeast

1/2 Tbsp. (1.5 tsp.) fine salt

3/4 cup sugar white granulated

1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened {kept at room temperature for an hour or softened inside the microwave for few seconds.}

3 pcs. med. size (60grms/each) fresh eggs

1.5 cup water, room temperature{a little more or less}

*For coating, enough bread crumbs to cover each Pandesal dough.

Direction;

Place flour, yeast, salt and sugar in the dough mixer, run on slow speed for a minute to blend ingredients.
Add the softened butter, eggs and water. Increase speed to medium-high and knead the mixture for
10-12 minutes or until smooth and elastic. A good mixture will have blisters on the dough surface.

Either brush the bowl or rub the dough surface with vegetable oil and place it back into the bowl,
cover with plastic film wrap or a damp cloth and let it rise for 1-2 hours or until double in bulk. Punch down dough and divide into two.
[Here’s how I do it] *Sweet Dough Recipe on the link has a complete photo tutorial.

On a greased working table, roll out or flatten the dough about 12 inches wide. From one end, roll up the dough to make a 12 inches log (bastón). Keep aside your 1st dough log and let it rest while you handle the other. Divide each log into 12 and cut with a dough cutter. Place Pandesal dough on a bread crumbs covered tray. Add more bread crumbs to cover all Pandesal dough. Transfer Pandesal dough on a clean baking tray(No need to grease the tray). Pre-heat the oven to 200’C. Let the Pandesal dough raise on a warm area for 1 hour. Baked for 10 minutes or until golden brown.

Serve hot with your favorite blend of coffee. Enjoy!!! 😉

Here’s how I do it;

Complete procedure with photo tutorial of making the Dough, Click here!

After you punch down the dough, divide it into two.
After you punch down the dough, divide it into two.
On a greased working table, roll out or flatten the dough about 12 inches wide.
On a greased working table, roll out or flatten the dough about 12 inches wide.
From one end, roll up the dough.
From one end, roll up the dough.
Roll it to make a 12 inches log (bastón).
Roll it to make a 12 inches log (bastón).
Keep aside your 1st dough log and let it rest while you handle the other.
Keep aside your 1st dough log and let it rest while you handle the other.
Divide each log into 12 and cut with a dough cutter.
Divide each log into 12 and cut with a dough cutter.
Place Pandesal dough on a bread crumbs covered tray.
Place Pandesal dough on a bread crumbs covered tray.
Add more bread crumbs to cover all Pandesal dough.
Add more bread crumbs to cover all Pandesal dough.
Transfer Pandesal dough on a clean baking tray(No need to grease the tray).
Transfer Pandesal dough on a clean baking tray(No need to grease the tray).

Pre-heat the oven to 200’C.

Let the Pandesal dough raise on a warm area for 1 hour.
Let the Pandesal dough raise on a warm area for 1 hour.
Baked for 10 minutes or until golden brown.
Baked for 10 minutes or until golden brown.
Pandesal Photo by Nino Almendra
Pandesal
Photo by Nino Almendra
Pandesal Photo by Nino Almendra
Pandesal
Photo by Nino Almendra
Pandesal Photo by Nino Almendra
Pandesal
Photo by Nino Almendra

Thanks alot for spending your precious time on my blog and hope this recipe

encourage you to try baking your own Pandesal at home or onboard.

Have you heard of Fiesta Friday? It’s happening everywhere!!! I mean EVERYWHERE!!!

All Bloggers are welcome to join the party, it is hosted by

Angie  of  “The Novice Gardener”

Come All You Party People!!!

fiesta-friday-badge-button-i-party

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Source/References;

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandesal

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salt

http://www.elizabethan-era.org.uk/ferdinand-magellan-ships.htm

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34 comments

  1. Thanks for sharing the pandesal recipe! I’m looking for a good pre-war recipe because my father has been asking if I could take a stab at recreating the pandesal of his childhood. 🙂 Will give this one a try very soon. Cheers!

    Like

  2. Greetings! Quick question that’s entirely off topic.
    Do you know how to make your site mobile friendly?
    My blog looks weird when browsing from my apple iphone. I’m trying
    to find a theme or plugin that might be able to correct this problem.
    If you have any recommendations, please share.
    Appreciate it!

    Like

  3. Thank you for liking my recent post on “almond coconut and grain-free granola.” I continue to be amazed at what you manage to cook on board a ship! I’m also amazing at what a good job you do photographing your steps. Safe travels my fellow food lover. -Moira

    Like

  4. Wow they look good,thanks for sharing will definitely give this recipe a try.
    Sad that they are not going to teach the history of the country to your children,I think it’s important to know their history.

    Like

  5. It’s so sad that your country is losing sight of its own history. The bread looks great, but I’m not sure I want to make enough to 24 crew, or a whole FF. I’ll have to wait for our next big party.

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  6. Fantastic bread Nino!! I will definitely try it!! By now you know I love baking :-)….This is perfect! I am impressed by all the delicious things you can prepare! 🙂

    Like

    • Hi Diahann! I love the style of your Lola, a true Pinoy breakfast ritual. I also wish to find a way to make it Gluten-Free, I’ll keep on searching for it! Thanks for the link, I’ll try to check it out. Have a great weekend 🙂

      Like

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